HPV is it worth it?

Facts you probably don’t know about HPV and Gardasil

In August, the Health Ranger interviewed neurosurgeon Dr. Russell Blaylock, M.D. on tv.naturalnews.com. Dr. Blaylock shared some little known facts about the human papillomavirus (HPV) and the quick development of a vaccine to address it. Dr. Blaylock says the vaccine is “predicated on an absolute lie.”
Some empowering facts you may not know about the human papillomavirus and  Gardasil:

1. First, the basis is wrong. HPV by itself does not cause cervical cancer. Evidence shows it takes a combination, or co-infections – multiple viruses or virus/bacteria combinations to cause cervical cancer.  

2. Birth control pills and other hormonal drugs also increase the risk of HPV.

3. It has never been proven that the HPV  vaccine prevents cervical cancer. There is no scientific evidence of any kind.

4. There are over 100 strains of HPV, only about 15 of which can contribute to cervical cancer.

5. HPV vaccines only include two to four strains, leaving you open to more than three fourths of the dangerous strains. You will still need to get routine screenings for cervical cancer.

6. You don’t change or reduce the incidence of cancer by receiving the vaccine. Studies show that the human immune system develops resistance to the strains given in the vaccine, allowing others to become predominant.

7. The CDC website states that the human body’s immune system clears HPV within two years, 90 percent of the time (70 percent in one year). Without the vaccine.


8. Those numbers are based on voluntary reporting, which historically means only two to ten percent of cases are represented. The vast majority of cases are never reported. So, conservatively, 5,000 young girls and women have been harmed by the vaccine.

9. Cervical cancer is one of the rarest cancers in the U. S., with 12,000 cases reported per year and 4,000 deaths.

10. The number of girls and women that experience serious complications from the vaccine meets or exceeds the number of deaths.

11. Side-effects include: Multiple sclerosis, encephalitis, blindness, pericarditis, coma, and death among many others.

12. The vaccine Gardasil was “fast tracked.” This was illegal. The FDA requires new vaccines to undergo testing and a waiting period of 4 years.  Gardasil was developed and on the market in 6 months, with FDA approval.

13.  Vaccinating  girls entering the sixth grade despite the fact that the incubation period for HPV averages 20 years with the median age of sufferers being 48.  Which means that if the vaccine did work it would have stopped working 15- 18 years before you needed it to work.

14.  Using a condom is a 100% way of not getting HPV of any kind. 

Many women are not aware that the HPV vaccine Gardasil might actually increase your risk of cervical cancer

Initially, that information came straight from Merck and was presented to the FDA prior to approval. According to Merck's own research, if you have been exposed to HPV strains 16 or 18 prior to receipt of Gardasil vaccine, you could increase your risk of precancerous lesions, or worse, by 44.6 percent.
Other health problems associated with Gardasil vaccine include immune-based inflammatory neurodegenerative disorders, suggesting that something is causing the immune system to overreact in a detrimental way—sometimes fatally.

Between June 1, 2006 and December 31, 2008, there were 12,424 reported adverse events following Gardasil vaccination, including 32 deaths. The girls, who were on average 18 years old, died within two to 405 days after their last Gardasil injection
Between May 2009 and September 2010, 16 additional deaths after Gardasil vaccination were reported. For that timeframe, there were also 789 reports of "serious" Gardasil adverse reactions, including 213 cases of permanent disability and 25 diagnosed cases of Guillain-Barre Syndrome
Between September 1, 2010 and September 15, 2011, another 26 deaths were reported following HPV vaccination
As of May 13, 2013, VAERS had received 29,686 reports of adverse events following HPV vaccinations, including 136 reports of death,7, as well as 922 reports of disability, and 550 life-threatening adverse events
Lawsuit Reveals Payouts of Nearly $6 Million to HPV Vaccine-Damaged Victims

On February 28, 2013 the government watchdog group Judicial Watch announced it had filed a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit against the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) to obtain records from the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP) related to the HPV vaccine8.

Nancy Banks on Vaccines
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5F_yj1T8Qu8&index=17&list=PLQi3oNHwGUuK4Dbhifvq3fVm8oC9n6Knm

Review of HPV Vaccine Trials Conclude Effectiveness Is Still Unproven

Last year, a systematic review11 of pre- and post-licensure trials of the HPV vaccine by researchers at University of British Columbia showed that the vaccine's effectiveness is not only overstated (through the use of selective reporting or "cherry picking" data) but also unproven. In the summary of the clinical trial review, the authors state it quite clearly:
"We carried out a systematic review of HPV vaccine pre- and post-licensure trials to assess the evidence of their effectiveness and safety. We found that HPV vaccine clinical trials design, and data interpretation of both efficacy and safety outcomes, were largely inadequate. Additionally, we note evidence of selective reporting of results from clinical trials (i.e., exclusion of vaccine efficacy figures related to study subgroups in which efficacy might be lower or even negative from peer-reviewed publications).
Given this, the widespread optimism regarding HPV vaccines long-term benefits appears to rest on a number of unproven assumptions (or such which are at odds with factual evidence) and significant misinterpretation of available data.
For example, the claim that HPV vaccination will result in approximately 70% reduction of cervical cancers is made despite the fact that the clinical trials data have not demonstrated to date that the vaccines have actually prevented a single case of cervical cancer (let alone cervical cancer death), nor that the current overly optimistic surrogate marker-based extrapolations are justified.
Likewise, the notion that HPV vaccines have an impressive safety profile is only supported by highly flawed design of safety trials and is contrary to accumulating evidence from vaccine safety surveillance databases and case reports which continue to link HPV vaccination to serious adverse outcomes (including death and permanent disabilities).
We thus conclude that further reduction of cervical cancers might be best achieved by optimizing cervical screening (which carries no such risks) and targeting other factors of the disease rather than by the reliance on vaccines with questionable efficacy and safety profiles." 
Fast Facts from this page
HPV by itself does not cause cervical cancer. Evidence shows it takes a combination, or co-infections – multiple viruses or virus/bacteria combinations to cause cervical cancer.  
There are over 100 strains of HPV, only about 15 of which can contribute to cervical cancer.
HPV vaccines only include two to four strains, leaving you open to more than three fourths of the dangerous strains. the human body’s immune system clears HPV within two years, 90 percent of the time (70 percent in one year). Without the vaccine. Vaccinating  girls entering the sixth grade despite the fact that the incubation period for HPV averages 20 years with the median age of sufferers being 48.  Which means that if the vaccine did work it would have stopped working 15- 18 years before you needed it to work. Using a condom is a 100% way of not getting HPV of any kind.