Happiness and Forgivness

Happiness

G-d didn't give the Torah to save us.  As Christians feel we needed saving and we need a blood sacrifice.  But G-d didn't say we needed saving.  If their religion is based on Judaism than the truth is G-d gave us the laws to show our obedience and he gave us Torah so we could learn.  He wants our happiness.  The closer you are to G-d the happier you become.  So we gave us the tools to find a path closer to him and happiness.  The sacrifices we never did because we needed a blood sacrifice to be forgiven for our sins.   Torah does't know the word sin that was added when the Greek translated the Torah.  Sacrifices we done for many reasons like coming closer to G-d, Submitting to G-d's will,  and to show gratitude. Sin, when we use the word means miss the mark.  It doesn't need salvation but a heavy heart and will to do better.  When you are sorry and bring it before G-d he will forgive us.  I have read a lot of views about G-d forgiving the wrongs you do against him but forgiveness for wrongs to ours must come from the person you wronged.

One big reason that Jesus was not our messiah is because the messiah we are waiting for doesn't have to save us or die for our sins.  We never needed a savior. Our anointed one (not savior)
will  be a great political leader and will be a real king over Israel and a descended from King David (Jeremiah 23:5). The mashiach is often referred to as "mashiach ben David" (mashiach, son of David). He will be well-versed in Jewish law, and observant of its commandments (Isaiah 11:2-5). He will be a charismatic leader, inspiring others to follow his example. He will be a great military leader, who will win battles for Israel. He will be a great judge, who makes righteous decisions (Jeremiah 33:15). But above all, he will be a human being, not a god, demi-god or other supernatural being.

Before the time of the mashiach, there shall be war and suffering (Ezekiel 38:16)

The mashiach will bring about the political and spiritual redemption of the Jewish people by bringing us back to Israel and restoring Jerusalem (Isaiah 11:11-12; Jeremiah 23:8; 30:3; Hosea 3:4-5). He will establish a government in Israel that will be the center of all world government, both for Jews and gentiles (Isaiah 2:2-4; 11:10; 42:1). He will rebuild the Temple and re-establish its worship (Jeremiah 33:18). He will restore the religious court system of Israel and establish Jewish law as the law of the land (Jeremiah 33:15).


It is fine that the Christians feel that Jesus was needed for these things but taking the history of the Jews and saying that this is their (our) messiah when we know what our messiah will do and G-d did not say he will do all these things the second time I send him but the first time it will be to save you from your sins.  For someone to say that the messiah will do these things in a second coming is saying  G-d was wrong the first time he told us or he changed his mind and neither of those are possible.

Jesus never said he would come back and be a king and bring all the jews back to their homeland, rebuild the temple, be a great leader and establish world peace.  He did say he would come back but to sit in judgement of the people.  He talks of the wars that will come before he comes and people being taken up and others left behind then he will come and judgement day will be here.  That has nothing to do with any of the things that our messiah will do.  

G-d gave us Torah to learn to become closer to us and to be happy.

G-d never told the Jewish people that they needed anything to get forgiveness but repentance. 
The Christian understanding is that Jesus, the one they believe to be the messiah, died for the sins of all humanity. In this view, the messiah is supposed to be the blood sacrifice necessary for the forgiveness of sin; in other words, a human sacrifice. However, not only is this concept of the messiah not found in our Bible, but we are also taught quite clearly and consistently that no one can die for the sins of another, that one person's guilt cannot be forgiven because of another person's death 
Judaism does not share the Christian concept of salvation, as it does not believe people are born in a "state of sin". Judaism holds instead that a person who sins can repent of that sin and, in most cases, have it forgiven.

For a quick and kinder message on this subject http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SVFcfG_GVvg


It would look to an outside by the different things we wear, different way of praying and all the traditions that we must be working hard to earn forgiveness from G-d.   But the things are not done for forgiveness but to feel closer to G-d.  The closer we get to G-d the happier we feel.  Some of the things we do is to set us a part from others.  Some of them like wearing tallit, kippahs or tzitzit are reminders of our covenant with G-d.  

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